An Indigenous Method of Cremation in Earthen Containers as a Sequel to Disaster Resilience: A Case Study of Kusheshwarsthan Wetland Area in Darbhanga District of North Bihar

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Vidyanath Jha

Abstract

The paper takes into account an indigenous adaptation for cremation in the extreme flood situations in the Kusheshwarsthan East C.D. block of Darbhanga district in north Bihar. With no dry land all around in the vicinity, people have no option other than raising a bamboo platform on which 6 to 8 fit high mud container (Kothi) is placed inside. The dead body is put in a squatting position. The fuels include
degrained maize cobwebs, dung cakes, wood splits of mango and desi ghee (clarified butter). Sugar crystals are added to invigorate the flames of the pyre. Wooden boats are hired to ferry the dead body as well as the mourners to the cremation place. Almost a decade-long practice of using degrained maize cobwebs as cremation fuel is an example of resilience during extreme flood disasters. At the same time insistence on using mango wood also for burning a dead body speaks of people's adherence to this plant, even during extremities.

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How to Cite
1.
Jha V. An Indigenous Method of Cremation in Earthen Containers as a Sequel to Disaster Resilience: A Case Study of Kusheshwarsthan Wetland Area in Darbhanga District of North Bihar. IJPE [Internet]. 7Nov.2022 [cited 27Nov.2022];8(02):149-52. Available from: https://ijplantenviro.com/index.php/IJPE/article/view/1425
Section
Case Report